Reading Teen | 10 January 2013 |

At a Glance:
Ever since I realized that zombies were didn't actually exist, they've been among my favorite of mythical creatures. And since there is a serious lack of good books about dragons and unicorns right now, zombie books are currently some of my favorite. So, when I see a book titled Zom-B with some pretty cover art, I am naturally attracted.

 

Action:
Besides the very beginning and the very end of the book, there is a surprisingly small amount of action in this book. However, what action there is, is all very well-written and very violent. Hidden in the pages of this small book is some of the most gruesome, gory, and completely disgusting violence I have ever read. I mean, I can't really expect anything else since the basic plot of this book is centered on a zombie outbreak, but there were still times at which I'd feel a bit queasy, reading very detailed descriptions of the undead feasting upon the brains of the living.

 


Romance:
There is no time in Zom-B in which romance is a factor.

 


Hero:
I'm don't think that I've ever read a book where I hated the main character quite as much as I did in Zom-B.
B is a terrible protagonist, and is certainly no hero. Raised by a father who often abuses B and his mother, B is one messed-up individual. He's a bully to anyone smaller than him; he never stands up to his father despite the fact that he knows all of his old man's teachings are wrong; and on top of all of that, he's a racist. Well, he's racist because his dad has forced own beliefs on his son. But it's still pretty bad. There's a part where B saves a baby boy from getting kidnapped, only to later regret it because the baby was Indian. So, simply put, I really hated B as a character.

 

Favorite Supporting Character:
I can only think of one character in the book who seemed like a legitimately good person, despite being a very minor role, and that was B's teacher Mr. Burke. He gave B sound advice on understanding his father's racism, which B completely ignored. Otherwise, this book is full of teens who are almost as equally messed up as B is.

 


Something I loved:
I liked the somewhat unique take on zombies explained in this book. A trait that makes them stand out among zombies in other fiction is their lack of fingernails and toenails. In the place of their nails, long, sharp bones protrude which they use to cut open the living's skulls and scoop out their brains. Violent, but cool.

 


Something I hated:
There were entirely too many characters in this book. All given stupid nicknames, coupled with the fact that there was very little character development, made it nearly impossible to discern one of B's friends from another.

 


Would I recommend it?
I would recommend this book anybody who likes a violent zombie story. There is no doubt that it is a well-written book, though I nearly stopped reading it over how much I disliked the characters.

Read more...Return to reviews listing

From the Gallery
  • Disappointing review?

    from Darren's Blog on 21 September 2019

    This is a bizarre one!

     

    As most of you probably already know, I write for adults as well as...

    Read full entry
  • TOUR details - see Shanville Monthly

    from Events on 06 August 2017


    Read full entry
  • From Twitter: