Crazy Bookworm | 22 November 2013 |

A book that has a moral at the end is hard to find and the Thin Execution by Darren Shan one of the very rare gem books that does have one.

 

Many people think that Darren Shan writes horror books but in fact this one is no worse than your average adventure book. Maybe one or two deaths but most people have death in their books.

 

It’s about a small, thin boy called Jebel Rum that lives in a family who are fearsome warriors. He has always been ridiculed due to his size, and one day his father announces his resignation in a year’s time, leaving the highest job of an executioner open.

 

But in the mean time he shames his little son in public by saying that only the two eldest of his brothers are going to fight for the place in a tournament. This angers Jebel and he goes on a quest, to a mountain where a god lives that supposedly gives you powers after you have sacrificed a slave.


Jebel decides that in order to restore his honor he must go, and the following day that is exactly what he does with a new slave in tow. The outcome is unclear about whether he will succeed where so many other stronger and braver than him have failed.

 

There seemed to be a never ending tide of events that they had to deal. I especially admire the way that the author used characters that they had met previously, to pop up again at the least expected moment and therefor adding an extra twist. If she had added extra characters I think it would have become too many and confusing so that is another positive reason for using that technique.

 

I also love this book so much because it really shows the way that a person can change their way of thinking after a series of events and the outcome that will take place. I found it funny to compare the boy at the start of the book with the one at the end. I found the parts where they discussed about different religion intriguing and they do make some valid points in there.

 

I would have preferred it more if they also added the thoughts of his servant a little more.

 

All in all I think this is a book for people over the age 14 or 13 that like adventure and religion. Its also a unisex book as I think Tom boys will like this as well as the normal boy.

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